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ER CHEN WAN - Two-Cured Formula / SELECT Granules, Pills, or Whole Herbs

Formulas

$ 49.00
- +

ER CHEN WAN **

Two Aged Ingredients, Two Old Valuable Herbs 

Formula Source: "Imperial Grace Formulary of the Tai Ping Era" (Tai Ping Hui Min He Ji Ju Fang) 1078 to 1085 AD.

 

Also Available as Teapills

When to Use ER CHEN WAN

Er Chen Wan is used for a cough with clear, white, or frothy phlegm indicating Lung Damp. It's also used to treat Spleen Deficiency which can be a cause of Lung Dampness.  Indications of this condition can include bloating, nausea, dizziness, or vomiting combined with copious sputum. 

  • Dries Dampness
  • Transforms Phlegm
  • Regulates Qi,
  • Harmonizes Spleen and Stomach
  • Dissolves Phlegm,
  • Resolves Spleen-Damp,
  • Regulates Qi
  • Harmonizes The Center.

 

ER CHEN WAN Safety Cautions and Contraindications

Contraindicated for dry cough due to dryness or Lung Yin deficiency, or for acute cough from common cold.  Prolonged use could cause internal dryness.  Pregnant or nursing women should consult their health care provider before taking any supplement.

ER CHEN WAN intended for health care professionals or for those knowledgeable of Traditional Chinese Medicine.
TCM is powerful and reliable, but it can be complex. Self-diagnosis and self-treatment aren't usually recommended. 
Best to find a nearby practitioner, or start an e-mail or phone consultation 

 

Best to keep your health care practitioner aware of the supplements you are taking, especially f you suffer from a cough for longer than two weeks, emphysema or other chronic lung conditions.

 

ER CHEN WAN Standard Dosage

Granules: 2-4 grams, taken 2-3 times a day, best on an empty stomach, or as prescribed

Lanzhou Tea Pills: 8 teapills, 3 times a day

Herbal Times Tablets: 4 tablets, 3 times a day

Whole Herbs: Using a container made of ceramic, glass, or stainless steel (no aluminum, iron or copper) boil 1 packet (50 grams) of herbs in 2-3 quarts of water for about 30 minutes, or until 2 cups of medicine remain. Strain herbs; save and refrigerate for a second boiling. (CHEN PI should be separated, and added during the final 3-5 minutes of boiling.)

Drink 1 cup in the AM. And 1 cup in the PM. If desired, repeat the following day, using the saved herbs from the refrigerator. 

How To Take Chinese Medicine & Drink Chinese Herbal Decoctions

"If bad taste means strong medicine, you're cured. " Some people enjoy drinking herbal blends, but for many of us, effective doses of medicinal herbs taste bad. To make matters worse, cooking herbs can befoul your kitchen (if not your whole house). However using a little common sense can make this a lot easier.

First, while cooking herbs, ventilate the kitchen. This stops the odor from deterring you (and your family). If you find the taste of your medicine disagreeable, hold your nose when you drink your herbs. This eliminates almost all the taste. Drink your herbs lukewarm or at room temperature. Hot liquids must be sipped slowly. If you hate the taste, you'll want to drink it down quickly. Cold liquids have less taste but may be hard to digest.After drinking your medicine, chew a few raisins or place a drop of lemon juice on your tongue to eliminate any aftertaste.

Herbs can be absorbed up to 30% better when taken on an empty stomach. Allow at least a half hour after taking herbs before eating or taking additional medicines. There are some exceptions. If your medicine proves difficult to digest, try taking it with food or after eating. Some doctors believe that formulas designed for the upper body should be taken after eating. Some medicines are best taken with other liquids such as wine (injuries or vascular problems), broth (to aid digestion of the herbs), or salt water (messenger to the Kidneys).

ER CHEN WAN Ingredients

  1. BAN XIA, Pinellia ternata rhizome,
  2. CHEN PI, Citrus reticulata peel
  3. FU LING, Poria cocos fungus
  4. GAN CAO, Gycyrrhiza uralensis root,
  5. SHENG JIANG, Zingiber officinale rhizome-fresh 


* These statements have not been evaluated by the US Food and Drug Administration. These products are not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease.

** What’s the Difference Between, PIAN, WAN, TANG, SAN, SHUI and GAO?

  • PIAN = Tablet (modern looking pill)
  • WAN = Pill (old-style or handmade pill, or black teapill)
  • TANG = Water Decoction (boiled whole herbs)
  • SAN = Powder (milled or granulated)
  • SHUI = Tincture (extract with alcohol or other solvent)
  • GAO = Paste (topical unguent or plaster)

This product is custom made and cannot be returned, refunded, or exchanged.

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